2017 Day Conference

October 20, 2017 by admin

Find below videos and media for Art and Disability Day Conference, 21st October 2017
Presented in collaboration with NDACA

NDACA-lockup-black

 

Richard Rieser


Download presentation powerpoint

 

Tony Heaton


Download presentation powerpoint

http://www.tonyheaton.co.uk/artwork.html

Breathe Nothing of Slaughter – Contradictions of death and impairment and sculpture of war memorials

 

Tanya Raabe Webber

Videos:
Art and Disability

Portraits Untold

Revealing Culture Head On

 

Barbara Lisicki

 

Sarah Dormer from NDACA

 

NDACA Animations
1.Social Model

2.The National Disability Arts Collection and Archive

3.Portraiture and Representation

4.The Disability Arts Movement: Art and Activism infused

 

Alison Lapper

http://www.alilapper.com/

No Body’s Perfect



Rachael Gadsden

October 13, 2017 by richard

“It took me a while to realise I was meant to be an artist” – Rachel Gadsden discusses her route into art, talking openly about disability and sharing human stories

Rachel Gadsden is an acclaimed artist whose work explores universal themes of fragility, survival and hope, drawing on her own personal experience of living with a chronic hereditary lung condition and visual impairment. She was made an Honorary Doctor of the University.

“It took me a while to realise I was meant to be an artist. My first diploma was in drama and I worked as an actress for a number of years. But the smoky environment had a catastrophic effect on my health. Eventually my lungs failed completely and I had to be fitted with a syringe driver that injects me with drugs once a minute. I couldn’t tour any more, so I needed to find something new to do. I made a picture for my husband and he said, I had no idea you could paint like this. This is what you should be doing.

rachel-gadsden-ubuntu-161380_large

Being out in the world

“For me, being an artist is about being out in the world. At first I did mainly commercial work. But I didn’t want to just make pretty pictures, so I went to art school. Then I had to find a way to make a living from my art. Going to drama school helped to teach me to be out there, rather than hiding in my studio. I think that helped make me more aware of and receptive to opportunities.

“Over the years, my work has shifted more and more into the public domain. After I did my masters in 2001, I started applying for residencies. The first was at a colliery in South Wales. Then I got an email from Hampton Court Palace saying they hadn’t had an artist in residence since Holbein and inviting me to apply. I ended up being there for a year. That led to an invitation to work with the Houses of Parliament on a project designed to raise awareness of mental health. Then I entered a competition as part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad and won a commission to do a project called Unlimited Global Alchemy. I went to South Africa to work with people living with HIV and AIDS, which was an incredible experience.

Performance_II.jpeg640x470

Sharing human stories

“I feel a natural affinity with marginalised communities. Whether it’s those communities in South Africa, or artists with disabilities in Qatar and the Middle East, or working to create drawings and animations for the Paralympic Heritage Torch ceremony, there is something there that I’m drawn to. There’s a fragility that speaks to me. I don’t consciously live my life thinking that I might not be here tomorrow, but that awareness does underpin everything I do.

For me, art is about sharing human stories, and exploring the things that bind us together despite our differences.

Rachel Gadsden

“My work is very physical. I guess that’s my theatrical background showing through. But there’s also a part of me that thinks, I started late, I’m only going to get one chance at this, so I want to do everything – photography, film, theatre, dance, the whole lot. Now I’m starting to lose my sight, I am finding new ways to communicate my vision so I’ve started experimenting with sculpture and 3D virtual drawing.

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Talking opening about disability

“I tried to hide my disability for a long time. I thought it would stop me getting work. When I applied for the residency at the colliery, I thought they’d never give it to a person with a lung condition. My twin sister made me a padded bag for my syringe driver and I wore a loose top. But the machine I had at the time made a noise, so every minute there’d be this beep. I had to pretend I didn’t know where it was coming from! Then I started to get a bit of a public persona and I began to feel uncomfortable that I wasn’t making use of the platform I’d been given.

So I made a decision that, whenever I could, I would talk openly about disability and do what I could to improve the status of people with disabilities in society.

Rachel Gadsden

“The project you’re working on is always the most exciting. But the work I’m doing at the moment with a group of bereaved women in Jerusalem has really struck a chord with me. I’m desperate to get back there and help them to tell their stories. It’s personal too. I grew up in the Middle East and when I last went I took my Mum’s diary where she talked about visiting the same places, and some of my Dad’s photos too. They both died recently and it helped me to feel closer to them. Their stories are mingled with mine and with these women’s too. We all feel love, and we all experience loss. It brings together a lot of the ideas I’m trying to express through my work.”

With a hereditary lung condition, she’s an advocate for raising disability awareness and her work explores universal themes of fragility, survival and hope.Rachel Gadsden, Honorary Doctor 2016, is an acclaimed visual artist whose work has spanned Hampton Court, the Houses Parliament and South Africa where she worked with people with HIV and aids.

Rachel is a British artist who is exhibited internationally and who works across the mainstream and disability art sectors, presenting cross-cultural visual dialogues that consider the most profound notions of what it is to be human.

Enter Unlimited Global Alchemy site

Unlimited Global Alchemy ImageUnlimited Global Alchemy is an artistic commission led by British visual artist Rachel Gadsden, in partnership with South African artist/activist Nondumiso Hlwele and the Bambanani Group (Khayelitsha Township, Cape Town, South Africa).

Gadsden’s artistic process explores the physical, historical and personal experience of aspects of the human condition. Experimenting with what the artist calls a psycho-geographical approach she explored the derelict asylum Cane Hill in Surrey in 2005. In documenting the process Tim Hayton said: “Rachel’s mixed media paintings, drawings, projections and videos attempt to capture the building’s struggle to survive and its inevitable physical demise, the decay being a tangible evocation of our own psychological ephemerality.”

In 2005 Gadsden received an Artsadmin Digital Media Bursary to develop a project narrating a history of North Wales Hospital in Denbigh. Ten years after the closure of the hospital an exhibition of her artwork Beyond the Asylum was shown in Denbigh Museum and Library, North Wales (2005) and Faith Gallery, Holton Lee, Dorset (2006).

In 2011/12 Gadsden exhibited Ubuntu as part of a GV Art London Group Show ‘TRAUMA: The Art and Science of Trauma’. The exhibition was in line with GV Art’s commitment to support artists who generate meaningful collaborations and dialogues with scientists to investigate the human condition. Gadsden exhibited artwork from her initial collaboration with The Bambanini Group of Khayelitsha Township investigating the experience of living with HIV/AIDS.The exhibition also included Luke Jerram’s glass microbiology sculptures of HIV.

Jester2_1.jpg250x357.766143106 Hampton Court Artist in residence©-Rachel-Gadsden_6_low-res Art Fights Social Taboos

In 2012 Gadsden won an award from the Arts Council’s Unlimited programme, designed to support disabled artists across the UK to create ambitious work covering all genres.

Working with the Bambanani Group in South Africa, Unlimited Global Alchemy explored the psychology and politics of HIV/AIDS through a series of collaborative artworks, film and workshops. Work from the project is now permanently exhibited in Mandela’s Walk to Freedom in Cape Town.

Luke Jennings in a Guardian review of Gadsden’s project Unlimited Global Alchemy said: “Gadsden is creating an artwork with frantic speed, fighting her own real-life fight against the dying of the light. In the act of painting, she tells us, she is “living in the second”. A profoundly affecting reminder of our shared humanity.”

In 2012 an exhibition catalogue of Unlimited Global Academy was published by Artsadmin. containing a series of essays on the work of the artist and written accounts as well as short talking heads films (on a CD accompanying the catalogue) of the personal and political journeys made by each of the Bambanani Group Members to counter discrimination experienced by people with AIDS/ HIV in South Africa. The catalogue for Unlimited Global Academy contains a foreword by author and Oxford University African Studies lecturer Jonny Steinberg who describes the project as the “product of a highly unusual consciousness.” Steinberg, citing Gadsden’s recognition of Bambanani Group Member, Nodumiso Hlwele’s motivation to create art as a way of managing chronic illness as a starting point for the collaboration. Steinberg goes on to say: “And not just unusual… but also important. For at a purely pragmatic level, those who make public works from this particular chronic illness, AIDS – be it in the form of art or advocacy or mass campaigns – are responsible for bringing these precious pills to countless people in the first place. Aside from producing powerful works for our contemplation, Gadsden, Hlwele and the rest of the Bambanani Group are also keeping a vital political matter alive.”

rachel_gadsden_and_the_bambanani_group.jpg338x272.653333333rachel-gadsden-1-big.jpg600x413The Pulsating Throne by Rachel Gadsden

In 2013 the Qatari Government’s UK Year of Culture featured “This Breathing World”, a major solo exhibition of 54 artworks & films as part of the first ever Art & Disability Festival in the Middle East at Katara Cultural Village, Doha.

In 2015 Gadsden was commissioned by the UK Parliament to create artwork as part of ‘The Beginnings of that Freedome’ exhibition, which were gifted to organisations across the UK in January 2016. 18 Banners were commissioned by Parliament to celebrate 800 years since Magna Carta was sealed and the 750th Birthday of the Montfort Parliament, including 2 banners by Gadsden ‘1601 Poor Law’ and ‘1829 Catholic Emancipation Act’breaking_barriers.jpg400x326.285714286

Acclaimed artist Rachel Gadsden makes artwork that explores universal themes of fragility, survival and hope, drawing on personal experience of living with a chronic hereditary lung condition and visual impairment. On the occasion of being made an Honorary Doctor of the London South Bank University (LSBU) she discusses her route into art.

Photo of artist Rachel Gadsden dressed in ceremonial gown

It took me a while to realise I was meant to be an artist. My first diploma was in drama and I worked as an actress for a number of years. But the smoky environment had a catastrophic effect on my health. Eventually my lungs failed completely and I had to be fitted with a syringe driver that injects me with drugs once a minute. I couldn’t tour any more, so I needed to find something new. I made a picture for my husband and he said, I had no idea you could paint like this. This is what you should be doing.

For me, being an artist is about being out in the world. At first I did mainly commercial work. But I didn’t want to just make pretty pictures, so I went to art school. Then I had to find a way to make a living from my art. Going to drama school helped to teach me to be out there, rather than hiding in my studio. I think that helped make me more aware of and receptive to opportunities.

Over the years, my work has shifted more and more into the public domain. After I did a masters in 2001, I started applying for residencies. The first was at a colliery in South Wales. Then I got an email from Hampton Court Palace saying they hadn’t had an artist in residence since Holbein and inviting me to apply. I ended up being there for a year. That led to an invitation to work with the Houses of Parliament on a project designed to raise awareness of mental health. Then I entered a competition as part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad and won a commission to do a project called Unlimited Global Alchemy. I went to South Africa to work with people living with HIV and AIDS, which was an incredible experience.

For me, art is about sharing human stories, and exploring the things that bind us together despite our differences. Whether I’m working with marginalised communities in South Africa, or disabled artists in Qatar and the Middle East, or working to create drawings and animations for the Paralympic Heritage Torch ceremony, there is something there that I’m drawn to. There’s a fragility that speaks to me. I don’t consciously live my life thinking that I might not be here tomorrow, but that awareness does underpin everything I do.

My work is very physical. I guess that’s my theatrical background showing through. But there’s also a part of me that thinks, I started late, I’m only going to get one chance at this, so I want to do everything – photography, film, theatre, dance, the whole lot. Now I’m starting to lose my sight, I am finding new ways to communicate my vision so I’ve started experimenting with sculpture and 3D virtual drawing.

I tried to hide my disability for a long time. I thought it would stop me getting work. When I applied for the residency at the colliery, I thought they’d never give it to a person with a lung condition. My twin sister made me a padded bag for my syringe driver and I wore a loose top. But the machine I had at the time made a noise, so every minute there’d be this beep. I had to pretend I didn’t know where it was coming from! Then I started to get a bit of a public persona and I began to feel uncomfortable that I wasn’t making use of the platform I’d been given. So I made a decision that, whenever I could, I would talk openly about disability and do what I could to improve the status of disabled people in society.

The project you’re working on is always the most exciting. But the work I’m doing at the moment with a group of bereaved women in Jerusalem has really struck a chord with me. I’m desperate to get back there and support them to tell their stories.

It’s personal too. I grew up in the Middle East and when I last went I took my Mum’s diary where she talked about visiting the same places, and some of my Dad’s photos too. They both died recently and it helped me to feel closer to them. Their stories are mingled with mine and with these women’s too. We all feel love, and we all experience loss. It brings together a lot of the ideas I’m trying to express through my work.

It is with huge excitement that London South Bank University  awarded me an Honorary Doctorate for my artistic practice and vision, which was presented at the Royal Festival Hall, South Bank, on Monday 7th November.

http://disabilityarts.online/magazine/opinion/rachel-gadsden-artist/

Glass_House010.jpg580x428.627160494

Glass House

http://www.rachelgadsden.com/videos

https://www.kettlemag.co.uk/article/womens-season-interview-visual-and-performance-artist-rachel-gadsden

http://www.rachelgadsden.com/rg-home



2017 Timeline

October 11, 2017 by admin

We want to examine artists who have been disabled, artists who have featured disabled people through a social model lens but also to understand the attitudes existing at different times over history towards disabled people through their portrayal in Art.

As a clear visual representation of this, we have made a timeline plotting different artists’ lives, working over the past 600 years.

View the timeline here



August Walla, 1936–

October 7, 2017 by richard

Born on June 22, 1936 in Klosterneuberg in Lower Austria, August Walla remained an only son and had a very tight bond with his mother, who raised him as if her were a girl, hoping thus to spare him being enlisted in the army. He imagined for a long time that Hitler was his father, not having known his own, who died during his early childhood. Incapable of adapting to school, he was placed in a specialized institution. At the age of nine, after having lived through the traumatizing experience of losing sleep for three months, he wrote in his school notebooks: “Everything that is red is diabolical.” The punching bag of his classmates, he remained helpless, regretting he was not a girl. At age 16, after having threatened to commit suicide and to burn down his house, he was committed for four years to a psychiatric hospital where he was diagnosed with schizophrenia. Upon his departure, his mother dedicated herself entirely to him. But in 1970, August was again admitted to the psychiatric ward, in the Gugging hospital, near Vienna. Sixteen years later, he became one of the members of the House of Artists (Haus der Künstler), created a few years earlier by Doctor Navratil outside the hospital, and where he would remain until the end of his life.

August Walla

Like Wölfli, Walla filled pages with writing and when the sheet of paper turned out to be too narrow, he covered the walls of his room with drawings and inscriptions. Sometimes, he even painted on trees or on roads, only to then photograph his messages with a camera he had painted green because he hated black. Walla constantly invented imaginary languages inspired by his readings of foreign language dictionaries. Writing and drawing are inseparable in his work, covered in obsessive symbols and which develops as a continuum, of which each part seems inseparable from the ensemble.

For almost 25 years, August Walla has been considered a “classic” of Art Brut and, as such, appears in the most important public and private collections

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Sigrid Hjerten, 1885–

by richard

Sigrid Hjertén was born 1885 in Sundsvall, Sweden. She was a pioneer of Swedish expressionism and the only female member of the artist group De Åtta. Together with her husband Isaak Grünewald, she traveled to Paris in 1909, in order to study painting in the studio of Matisse. Before Hjertén took up painting, she taught textile design, and like Matisse’s work, is a very palpable. She so was deeply inspired by Cezanne. In 1911 Hjertén’s and Grünewald’s son Iván was born. He is a frequent subject of her paintings. Since she was not in the cold Swedish climate, (she called Sweden “the bear country”), she spent long periods of time in southern Europe with her family.

There is a wide-spread myth that Sigrid Hjertén was completely unsuccessful as an artist during her lifetime. However, she participated in over 100 exhibitions during her career as a painter. Solo shows at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm and at Gothenburgs Konstholl were among the most important shows.

the artist worked on very personal topics. One of her most famous pictures is the painting Atelierinteriör, The central motif of the painting is two men, engaged in an intense discussion with one another, and the painter Einar Jolin (likewise a member of De Åtta). Between the two men the artist painted herself; she sits with her hands in her lap, her gaze rigid, facing straight ahead. In the foreground of the picture, Hjertén set a confident female figure. She is dressed in all black, dividing the image plane like a shadow. Perhaps this is an ideal self-image of the artist. The painter Nils of Dardel sits beside. In the far right corner, her son Iván gazes out of the picture.

Sigrid_Hjerten_-_Atiljeinterior Studio Interior 1916

Sigrid Hjertén was born 1885 in Sundsvall, Sweden. She was a pioneer of Swedish expressionism and the only female member of the artist group De Åtta. Together with her husband Isaak Grünewald, she traveled to Paris in 1909, in order to study painting in the studio of Matisse. Before Hjertén took up painting, she taught textile design, and like Matisse’s work, is a very palpable. She so was deeply inspired by Cezanne. In 1911 Hjertén’s and Grünewald’s son Iván was born. He is a frequent subject of her paintings. Since she was not in the cold Swedish climate, (she called Sweden “the bear country”), she spent long periods of time in southern Europe with her family.

There is a wide-spread myth that Sigrid Hjertén was completely unsuccessful as an artist during her lifetime. However, she participated in over 100 exhibitions during her career as a painter. Solo shows at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm and at Gothenburgs Konstholl were among the most important shows.

Sigrid Hjertén was plagued by depression for many years, in 1936 they caused her to stop painting. She spent the last years of her life in a psychiatric institution in Stockholm. In 1948 she died due to the ramifications of a failed lobotomy.

Today Sigrid Hjerten is one of the most important artists of Swedish modernism. Her paintings are in the collections of the Moderna Museet in Stockholm and the Göteborgs Konstmuseum, among others.

Inventarienr: MOM 390 Konstnärens namn:  Sigrid Hjertén Originaltitel: Den röda rullgardinen Alternativ titel: The Red Blind Datum: 1916 Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Inventarienr: MOM 390
Konstnärens namn: Sigrid Hjertén
Originaltitel: Den röda rullgardinen
Alternativ titel: The Red Blind
Datum: 1916
Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Isaac Grunwald 1916

Issac Grunwald 1916

Sigrid Hjert_n Tutt'Art@ (8)

Sigrid Hjert_n Tutt'Art@ (3)

Inventarienr: MOMB 167 Konstnärens namn:  Sigrid Hjertén Originaltitel: Hinduiska Alternativ titel:  Datum: 1930 Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Inventarienr: MOMB 167
Konstnärens namn: Sigrid Hjertén
Originaltitel: Hinduiska
Alternativ titel:
Datum: 1930
Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Inventarienr: NM 6307 Konstnärens namn:  Sigrid Hjertén Originaltitel: Badstrand Alternativ titel: Beach Datum: ca 1930 Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Inventarienr: NM 6307
Konstnärens namn: Sigrid Hjertén
Originaltitel: Badstrand
Alternativ titel: Beach
Datum: ca 1930
Fotograf: Prallan Allsten

Sigrid Hjertén was plagued by depression for many years, in 1936 they caused her to stop painting. She spent the last years of her life in a psychiatric institution in Stockholm. In 1948 she died due to the ramifications of a failed lobotomy.

Today Sigrid Hjerten is one of the most important artists of Swedish modernism. Her paintings are in the collections of the Moderna Museet in Stockholm and the Göteborgs Konstmuseum, among others.

There is the widespread myth that Sigrid Hjertén had no success as an artist during her lifetime. During her active career as a painter she participated in more than 100 exhibitions. Her most important appearances were solo exhibitions at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Stockholm and the Kunsthalle in Göteborg.

The artist has often worked with very personal themes using colour to show emotion. As her depression worsened so did the use of darker colours.

 

In any case, Sigrid Hjertén complains of growing loneliness: Isaac Grünwald, who has various lovers during the marriage, moves back to Sweden, first staying in Paris. Later she follows him. In Stockholm, schizophrenia is diagnosed, after a treatment the artist is doing better, and she starts painting again. At the end of the thirties, suffering became overpowering. There are no further pictures from the studio of Sigrid Hjertén. Ten years later, the Swedish painter died of the consequences of a lobotomy which at that time was regarded as a cure for severe mental illness.